The Dark Days Club

The Dark Days Club and The Dark Days Pact by Alison Goodman

This YA fantasy trilogy is set in the Regency period in England (think Jane Austen). Lady Helen learns she is a Reclaimer, gifted with the strength and talent to fight Deceivers, people possessed by demonic spirits who feed off the life energy of others. Some of the fantasy elements struck me as just silly, especially when I tried to picture them visually, or say the made-up words aloud, but if you just go with it (an approach necessary for enjoying much fantasy) it pays off. The period language is fun, as is the juxtaposition of proper speech with scary, violent situations. Lady Helen is an admirable heroine, brave and selfless. She spends a significant portion of the second book in men’s clothes. Details like period dress, locations, and history are well-researched and informative. Lord Carlston, who inducts Lady Helen into the Dark Days Club and teaches her to be a Reclaimer, qualifies as a classically inscrutable and intense Byronic hero. Supporting characters, especially Darby, Lady Helen’s stout maid, are well-drawn and interesting. The plots are structured around mysteries that Lay Helen ably solves–at considerable personal cost.

I was particularly impressed by the ending of The Dark Days Pact. Goodman set her climax inside a real historical murder, explained the mystery of Lord Carlston’s illness and his strong connection with Lady Helen–and then revealed a complication that will keep them apart. Goodman is currently working on the third book in the trilogy, which doesn’t yet have a release date.

All the Bright Places

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

This YA novel is about a young couple falling in love…and suicide. The male lead and half-time narrator Finch is a manic pixie dream boy–and the key word there is manic–but he’s very endearing and romantic. He partners with Violet for a gimmick of a class project that forces them to explore unusual places in their state, Indiana. There’s some real talk about grief, and some real family dysfunction that isn’t quite overcome. It has an ending that is both surprising and expected, that’s sad without being entirely bleak and depressing. The love story is sweet and hard and perplexing, one that doesn’t have to last forever for the survivor to emerge wiser and stronger. As romantic as the story is, it thoroughly avoids romanticizing suicide.

And I Darken

And I Darken by Kiersten White

I liked White’s paranormal romance series, so I was interested to pick up this historical/fantasy series as well. This story is about a brother and sister, children of an Eastern European prince in the Middle Ages. They are sent to live in the court of the Ottoman Empire as assurance of their father’s cooperation. There they befriend the sultan’s son and take part in many intrigues and adventures, from an aborted coup to a failed siege. The story is dark and violent, with Lada, the sister, as a particularly prickly and tough warrior-princess. Her insistence on receiving military training, and on assuming command of a regiment, pushes gender boundaries. The climax is exciting, and the ending bittersweet. It’s YA, but probably on the ‘mature’ end of the genre.

The sequel, Now I Rise, comes out this year.

We Were Liars

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

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In this contemporary YA novel, Cady Sinclair’s rich, privileged, severely emotionally repressed family spends every summer on a private island, where she and her cousins enjoy sun, sand, and each other’s friendship. Then Cady is injured mysteriously and can’t remember what happened. Two years later she returns to the island and tries to make sense of her family’s tragedy. I was very intrigued by the fairy tales Cady tells to make sense of her relatives and her place among them. As the cracks in the WASPy family’s façade start showing, I could barely put the book down. But ultimately I found the amnesia clichéd, and was a little disappointed by the revelation of the mystery–it was a bit too Sixth Sense for me. I liked the book, but not as much as Lockhart’s other two that I’ve read, The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks and Dramarama.

Lady Midnight

Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare

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This novel begins a new series in Clare’s Shadowhunter universe. Previous related books were the Mortal Instruments series and the steampunk-inspired Infernal Devices trilogy. With the exception of Clare’s messy first book, City of Bones, her novels are well-written in a way that’s typical of the YA fantasy genre. It’s definitely light reading, but I find this universe fun and rich, imaginative and humorous. I think Clare has been improving with more writing experience. Her characters, especially the male leads, get stronger and less annoying each time she creates a new set of them. And the characters from previous series (yes, even the one set in the 1800s) make cameo appearances, as the universe grows in complexity and population.

This story begins five years after the end of City of Heavenly Fire and concentrates on the Los Angeles institute, where young Shadowhunters are still dealing with the fallout from the Mortal War. Julian has responsibility for his younger siblings since his father’s death. Emma is still dealing with her parents’ murder and nurtures revenge fantasies. These two are parabatai–a ritualized relationship for Shadowhunter best friends that enables them to offer each other extra protection and support. But the problem is that they’re falling in love, and parabatai are supposed to be strictly platonic. That’s the source of the book’s sexual tension and angst. The action starts when some fairies show up at the institute and ask Emma and Julian to solve a series of murders that she thinks might be related to those of her parents.

The sequel, Lord of Shadows, is coming out later this year.

The Darkest Part of the Forest

The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

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This fairy story begins with a vision of a horned boy asleep in a glass coffin, and a small town’s troubled relationship with the fairy world at its border. The sleeping fairy prince in his unbreakable box is a tourist attraction and a site of illicit high school revels. The action gets started when one morning the horned boy is gone, his coffin shattered.

The main characters are brave Hazel and Ben, her gay brother who has an amazing musical talent, gifted from a fairy. As children they made a game of protecting the town from dangerous fairies and hags. Years ago, Hazel made a bargain with a fairy, the results of which are revealed slowly and dramatically. Their friend, Jack, a changeling, also becomes involved as the fairy court intrigues are uncovered.

This is just the kind of YA fantasy I love. A mystery. Two love stories. A dangerous but enchanting fairy world hovering just below the surface of reality. Complex relationships and moral questions and issues of guilt and complicity and unintended consequences. Nontraditional gender roles. A story that works on a metaphorical level as well as literally. Startling, strange, and fantastic descriptions. Sparkling sentences. Highly recommended to anyone who likes this genre.

Siege and Storm

Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo

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This series is the kind of thing that makes me want to fangirl all over the place. I loved the dreamy/nightmarish Russian-inspired setting, and the way magic works in this fantastic realm. Mal and Alina’s romance in Shadow and Bone was so sweet, and compared to the way they act in this book, innocent. But in a second book of a trilogy, things have to get complicated. Mal and Alina are clearly made to be together, but they’re bad at communicating, and their circumstances pull them apart. There are petty jealousies and new inequalities of rank. It’s sad to see people who love each other hurt each other, not in spite of their love but because of it. Mal acts both idiotically and with stubborn honor; Alina doesn’t work hard enough to keep him close to her, mostly because she doesn’t quite understand that that is where he wants to be. I love that this heroine has considerable lust for power and darkness within her, in addition to her sarcastic, prickly personality and inferiority complex–she’s not sunshine and roses even though her power is literally summoning light. In this book, Alina and Mal spend a lot of time in the royal palace, and a new character is a very romantic figure–a second-born prince, rumored to be a bastard, who has been away from the capital inventing flying machines while disguised as a privateer. I was afraid he would turn the story into a love triangle, but thankfully Alina is never really tempted by his (and his brother’s) pragmatic proposals.  Though the tone is often incredibly dark, there are also many funny moments. Like many #2’s in trilogies, the ending seems like it’s as bad as it can be–an explosion of violence, the heroine willingly handing herself over to the villain to save her friends. But you know it’s only going to get worse. I can’t wait to pick up the finale.