The Runaway Princess and The Runaway Dragon

These two children’s books take a lot of fairy tale tropes and give them a feminist spin. I’d recommend them to any parent of a princess-obsessed girl.

The Runaway Princess by Kate Coombs

This story begins with a typical princess setup: the king and queen lock a princess in a tower and call for princes to compete for her hand in marriage. But this princess isn’t having it: she escapes and works to complete the tasks set by the king so that she can win her own hand. She befriends the witch and the bandits that the princes were told to defeat, and reveals the cheating committed by the princes. She finds a baby dragon, that becomes her pet. It’s a bright and happy story with a satisfying ending.

The Runaway Dragon by Kate Coombs

This sequel begins with the almost grown, somewhat neglected dragon running away, and Meg going off on a quest to find it. Her parents make her take a bunch of royal guards, and the party gets lost in an enchanted forest, where a dwarf who is knowledgeable of fairy tale tropes gives them lots of advice. Meg’s friends end up in a giant’s castle, while she and her magician outwit an evil sorceress. I like how a romantic subplot is a bit of an afterthought, rather than the main point. The focus is on Meg’s desire for adventure, her worry for her pet dragon, and solving the problems that she and her friends get themselves into.

Mediocre Mysteries

I recently read the first books in a couple mystery series, and they didn’t impress me. It’s possible that the later books improve, but I won’t be continuing the series.

Still Life by Louise Penny

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In this mystery, murder comes to a small town in Quebec and wise Inspector Gamache comes down to investigate. Paintings are a major clue and plot device as a surprising number of the characters are artists. The setting is preciously picturesque, and the portrayal of gay characters seems a bit stereotyped. The villain, when finally revealed, is almost cartoonishly evil. I was constantly annoyed by the too-stupid-to-live new girl on the team, who never listened, learned or improved. It’s also possible that dour, plodding voice of the audiobook reader soured me on this one.

In the Last Analysis by Amanda Cross

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The detective in this book is an English professor whose close friend is a phychoanalyst who has had a patient murdered on his couch. The characters talk about psychoanalysis in a way that seemed very stigmatizing to me. I was intrigued by this series because I like the idea of an academic as a detective. But the thing that bugged me the most about this book is that all the characters talk the same way–like they were all English professors, full of pontificating allusions and SAT vocab words. And the solution to the mystery is convoluted in a way that seemed silly and unrealistic to me.

We Were Liars

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

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In this contemporary YA novel, Cady Sinclair’s rich, privileged, severely emotionally repressed family spends every summer on a private island, where she and her cousins enjoy sun, sand, and each other’s friendship. Then Cady is injured mysteriously and can’t remember what happened. Two years later she returns to the island and tries to make sense of her family’s tragedy. I was very intrigued by the fairy tales Cady tells to make sense of her relatives and her place among them. As the cracks in the WASPy family’s façade start showing, I could barely put the book down. But ultimately I found the amnesia clichéd, and was a little disappointed by the revelation of the mystery–it was a bit too Sixth Sense for me. I liked the book, but not as much as Lockhart’s other two that I’ve read, The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks and Dramarama.

I Wrote a Guest Post on Dad Gone Wild

I wrote something about my experience in an alternative teacher licensure program and sent it to TC Webber of Dad Gone Wild. He posted it and hopefully it will get the conversation going about teacher training. Here’s a permanent link. I’m super excited that Diane Ravitch retweeted me!

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Playing Big

Playing Big: Find Your Voice, Your Mission, Your Message by Tara Mohr

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This women’s career self-help book is focused on women who have not quite reached their high potential. It’s a much more inclusive, less corporate version of Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In. Mohr strikes a delicate balance–asking women to take responsibility for their success while acknowledging the pervasiveness of discrimination, the double bind, and other factors that limit them. She explains the difficult situation we find ourselves in, and gives solid advice for motivation and confidence. She also includes a lot of examples of women diving into hobbies and activism as a way of “playing big,” decoupling women’s ambition from striving for prestige and money in the business world. Her advice is mostly focused on building confidence and on encouraging women to take bigger risks. She hopes to inspire women to stop constantly putting off focusing on their goals, to refuse to settle for mediocrity. Along with The Confidence Code, I’d say this is my new favorite self-help book targeting women and their careers.

Mohr does discuss parenting and the ways that family plans change and limit women’s careers. But she doesn’t talk about how for many women, getting married and/or having children is itself the way that they “play big” and reach for their dreams. Planning a family and making the decision to conceive a child or buy a house could be the thing that makes them excited, that gives them the feelings of awe and excitement that Mohr names pachad and yirah. Maybe that’s controversial to say, but it’s a feeling I have had and that many women share. It’s hard to talk about family-making as a dream without implying that all women will be totally content, with their ambitions completely satisfied and their talents fully utilized, by the work of raising children. Maybe Mohr believes that women don’t need as much encouragement to leap wholeheartedly into plans for family as they do for career and personal development. I’d agree with that, so or that reason I can understand why Mohr focused instead on career and creative pursuits. She wrote this book at an interesting moment in her life–as she was pregnant with her first child. I will be interested to see how motherhood influences Mohr’s later writing.

Armada

Armada by Ernest Cline

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I picked up this book because I liked Cline’s first novel, Ready Player One. This story has a lot of the same nerdy inspirations, but without the post-apocalyptic darkness and incisive critique of corporate tyranny. This sci-fi novel is about an alien invasion and a far-reaching conspiracy to ready humanity to fight it off through training an army of video gamers to operate drones. The narrator is Zack Lightman, a top gamer recruited by the Earth Defense Alliance to pilot spaceships remotely. Through observing that the real aliens act a little too much like simulations of themselves, he uncovers a conspiracy within the conspiracy and saves planet Earth. It’s fun, sprinkled with lots of pop culture trivia, and structured self-consciously around Joseph Campbell’s hero’s journey. It felt like a novelization of one of the summer blockbusters so frequently referenced–definitely light reading. The ending seemed a little bit open, so that I wondered if there is a sequel in the works.

Classic Women’s Lit Rewritten

I think it’s fun and potentially instructive when authors rewrite or draw inspiration from classic literature. These two books offer new perspectives on two of my favorite 19th-century novels.

Reader, I Married Him: Stories Inspired by Jane Eyre edited by Tracy Chevalier

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This collection of short stories is inspired by Jane Eyre, in particular by the triumphant ending line quoted in the title. It’s really interesting to see how this wide variety of writers took that idea and ran with it in so many different directions. There are stories here that retell Jane Eyre from the perspectives of different characters, memorably Grace Poole and Rochester, some concentrating on her boarding school or her time with St. John Rivers, some changing the setting to contemporary or another country or even a sci-fi future. In some of them, the connection to Jane Eyre is small, but it’s fun to look for it. Chevalier’s opening essay is solid and fun, nostalgic in a way that many of us feel about Bronte. If you like short stories, Jane Eyre, and/or the authors included here, including Audrey Niffenegger, Elizabeth McCracken, and Emma Donogue, you’d enjoy this volume too.

Charlotte Collins: A Continuation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice by Jennifer Becton

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This book is a kind of fan fic sequel to Pride and Prejudice that concentrates on a minor character, Charlotte Lucas, Elizabeth Bennett’s friend who marries the obsequious minister Mr. Collins. I was disappointed that the book didn’t tell much about Charlotte’s marriage, instead beginning with her widowhood. Now, no one wants to read about Mr. Collins, one of the most annoying characters ever written, and everyone rejoices at his early demise and Charlotte’s freedom, but in a way this makes achieving happiness seem almost too easy for Charlotte. This book takes for granted that her marriage to Collins was a mistake, but I’m not sure Austen would agree. I was somewhat disappointed that Elizabeth and Darcy didn’t appear in the book much either.

The action of this novel begins when Charlotte’s younger sister Maria joins her in her widow cottage and starts husband-hunting, attracted by a young American. Each sister has two suitors, one good and initially disparaged, one bad and initially pursued. Maria is careless and boy-crazy at least for the first half of the book, while Charlotte is prim and proper in an exaggerated way, so much so that the central problem, when it finally comes up, is one that you can barely believe she would ever get herself into. The sentence-level writing is Austen-inspired and fun. I had mixed feelings about this one. Probably only a serious Austen fan would enjoy it.