Dearly, Departed

Dearly, Departed by Lia Habel

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This is a YA paranormal romance in the Twilight vein, complete with hot undead guy, overdramatic heroine, a precipitously fast fall into love, angsty declarations, and dangers that seem formulated mostly for the sake of testing the couple’s bravery and selflessness. The characters often seemed caricatured, the humor often coming from exaggerating the surface-level traits that are supposed to them feel like people but instead make them feel like paper dolls in a fan fic. This take on the zombie is fairly interesting–not all zombies lose their minds and humanity, and some of them become soldiers in the army who fight other zombies. The descriptions of the science behind this new(ish) kind of zombification was about as believable as these things can be. Also, the action sequences, which comprised a large part of the book, were fairly well done.

The setting might be the element that I had the most trouble with. It’s a couple centuries into the future, after environmental catastrophes have driven people towards tropical areas. During this migration, Victorian fashions, etiquette, and social norms came back into vogue.

Honestly, I can’t understand how that could ever happen. I know it’s silly to talk about realism in a book about zombies, but just seems so politically naïve to imagine that any group of people would ever voluntarily adopt the lifestyles of the Victorian era after 3 centuries of enjoying more liberal customs. The expense and physical constraint of the women’s clothes are enough reason for this regression to be impossible. If the purpose is to combine Victorian aesthetics with modern medicine and tech, an alternative history, like those in Scott Westerfeld’s steampunk YA novels, would have been a much more believable background story. Maybe this thought makes me cynical, but the only way I can imagine a large group of people living like Victorians in the future is if elites force them to, because no one but rich, titled, first-born, land-owning white men benefitted under that system. It would have to be a conspiracy to take rights and power away from women and the poor on a massive scale. On the other hand, I understand that Victorian dress is super cool, and Victorian etiquette and social conventions create lots of fun narrative possibilities. So it seems there are two possibilities here. Either the book has romanticized the Victorian era for entirely superficial reasons–the cool clothes and the marriage market plot–or the series will eventually prove that the New Victorian society is a purposely engineered dystopia as the allegiance of the characters switches to the Punks. I’m not sure whether or not I’ll stick around to see if that happens though. The contrived cliffhanger ending didn’t sell me on the sequel.

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